The post office in Arnold, MO may be moved to new location. The USPS says it will not hold the required public meeting due to Covid. Four days ago, the PMG attended a ceremony to celebrate the Katharine Graham stamp. Indoors, no masks, no issues. https://www.myleaderpaper.com/news/arnold-post-office-may-move-to-new-location/article_24e496f0-ece9-11ec-a624-97184ddc10ff.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=user-share

The post office in Coram, MT (near Glacier National Park) was set to close at the end of the June, but a petition drive and letters by Senator Jon Tester and Steve Daines may succeed in keeping it open.
#flickr https://flic.kr/p/7k4auE

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A ray of hope for the post office in Coram

Things are looking up for the post office in Coram.

dailyinterlake.com

The USPS has introduced a new dashboard that tracks the results of the Customer Experience Satisfaction survey (down to the facility level), but it's only for employees and not available to the public.
https://link.usps.com/2022/06/17/service-snapshot/

It is physically impossible to exceed the 70-pound domestic weight limit for a small flat rate box.

The interior dimensions (8 5/8" x 5 3/8" x 1 5/8") are ~75.333 in^3.

If you filled the box with pure osmium, the densest substance known to man, it would weigh ~61.48 lbs.

USPS seeks comments on the relocation of Albany’s Academy Station Post Office, but no public meeting will be held due to Covid. OTOH, the PMG has been holding swearing-in events for new postmasters, in public, no masks. https://www.wamc.org/capital-region-news/2022-06-10/unclear-future-for-albanys-academy-station-post-office-as-public-comments-are-sought

Here's the USPS's Federal Register notice about the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the next-gen fleet. It says changes to the delivery network warrant an increase in the minimum number of electric vehicles. Comments are due by July 25. https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2022-12581

It could be that the contract doesn't say anything about giving Amazon preference, or, more likely, that this isn't an Amazon contract at all. The PRC suggests the unions work with the USPS to identify the correct docket and work out the details for maintaining confidentiality .

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Featured image for “To Be Discontinued: The Postal Service identifies 170 suspended post offices for permanent closure”

To Be Discontinued: The Postal Service identifies 170 suspended post offices for permanent closure

Earlier this week the Postal Service shared a list with the Postal Regulatory Commission identifying 170 post offices that were “temporarily” suspended several years ago and that will soon be…
Featured image for “Rationale for a Suspension Dashboard: Comments for the PRC’s Public Inquiry”

Rationale for a Suspension Dashboard: Comments for the PRC’s Public Inquiry

The USPS and PRC should create a dashboard with information about post offices that have been suspended. It’s “a commonsense way to make sure the Postal Service is keeping everyone…
Featured image for “Counting Up Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps”

Counting Up Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps

In August 2020, amidst the pre-election furor over collection box removals, a FOIA request was submitted to the USPS asking for data about the removals. Nineteen months later, the USPS…
Featured image for “Lost in Limbo: Post Offices Under Suspension”

Lost in Limbo: Post Offices Under Suspension

When the Postal Service considers closing a post office, it must go through a lengthy discontinuance process, with 30 steps of administrative review and opportunities for public input. But when…
Featured image for “How slower mail has become a fact of life: USPS Service Performance and Postal Reform”

How slower mail has become a fact of life: USPS Service Performance and Postal Reform

Last week the Postal Service published its service performance reports for the first quarter of fiscal year 2022 (Oct-Dec 2021). This is our first opportunity to see any details about…
Featured image for “Reply to the USPS: How the new service standards will cause geographic discrimination”

Reply to the USPS: How the new service standards will cause geographic discrimination

Briefs and Replies have been submitted for the PRC’s Advisory Opinion on the USPS plan to slow down First Class mail. Here’s my Reply Brief.…

New Dashboard tracks emergency suspensions

When the Postal Service closes a post office for an emergency, like unsafe building conditions after a weather event or a last-minute breakdown in lease negotiations, it's supposed to correct the problem as soon as possible — by making repairs, settling the lease issue or finding a new location. The Postal Service, however, may choose instead to initiate a study about whether or not to close the post office permanently.

The law does not specify a time frame for re-opening the office or completing the discontinuance process, so some post offices can end up in limbo for many years. A large backlog of unresolved suspensions sometimes develops. At the end of fiscal year 2021, there were about 450 post offices under suspension, nearly a hundred of them going back to 2012 or before.

In February, the Postal Regulatory Commission opened a Public Inquiry docket (its second on suspensions) to examine how the the resolution of these suspensions might be expedited, presumably through a modification of the rules governing discontinuances.

To provide a clearer picture of the suspensions and to lend some transparency to the process of resolving them as it unfolds, we’ve created a Suspension Dashboard. It includes a page for each of the 450 suspended offices, with information about its suspension status, community demographics and facility data.

You can view the new suspension dashboard here.

When the Postal Service closes a post office for an emergency, like unsafe building conditions after a weather event or a last-minute breakdown in lease negotiations, it's supposed to correct the problem as soon as possible — by making repairs, settling the lease issue or finding a new location. The Postal Service, however, may choose instead to initiate a study about whether or not to permanently close the post office.

The law does not specify a time frame for re-opening the office or completing the discontinuance process, so some post offices can end up in limbo for many years. A large backlog of unresolved suspensions sometimes develops. At the end of fiscal year 2021, there were about 450 post offices under suspension, nearly a hundred of them going back to 2012 or before.

In February, the Postal Regulatory Commission opened a Public Inquiry docket (its second on suspensions) to examine how the the resolution of these suspensions might be expedited, presumably through a modification of the rules governing discontinuances.

To provide a clearer picture of the suspensions and to lend some transparency to the process of resolving them as it unfolds, we’ve created a Suspension Dashboard. It includes a page for each of the 450 suspended offices, with information about its suspension status, community demographics and facility data.

You can view the new suspension dashboard here.

Counting Up Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps

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On August 20, 2020, amidst the furor over box removals, Robert Bracco, using the muckrock.com FOIA request website, filed a request asking the Postal Service to provide data “pertaining to the existence, addition, removal, or relocation of USPS collection boxes inside the United States and territories created or altered after 8/15/2019.”

On March 25, 2022 — nineteen months after the request was filed, and after seventeen follow-up messages inquiring on the status of the request — the Postal Service finally responded. It provided three lists of collection box locations in service in December 2019, 2020 and 2021. The lists make it possible to track additions and removals over this two-year period. We have the lists and maps here.

Service Performance Update

Chart by Visualizer

On October 1, 2021, the Postal Service lowered service standards for First Class mail, saying that this would allow it to deliver 95 percent of the mail on time. Since October, scores have averaged about 89 percent, and the Postal Service now says it will not reach 95 percent for two or three years. The new target for FY 2022 is 91 percent.

The weekly performance scores are being submitted as evidence in Pennsylvania v. DeJoy. The most recent report is here. For more performance data, check out our dashboard.

Service Performance Update

Chart by Visualizer

On October 1, 2021, the Postal Service lowered service standards for First Class mail, saying that this would allow it to deliver 95 percent of the mail on time. Since October, scores have averaged about 89 percent, and the Postal Service now says it will not reach 95 percent for two or three years. The new target for FY 2022 is 91 percent.

The weekly performance scores are being submitted as evidence in Pennsylvania v. DeJoy. The most recent report is here. For more performance data, check out our dashboard.

The Year in Review

The Year in Review