Modeling the New USPS Delivery Network: List & Map

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This month the Postal Service will begin implementing a massive initiative to change how the mail is delivered. Instead of working out of the back of post offices, letter carriers will be relocated to large, centralized facilities called Sorting & Delivery Centers. The Postal Service has provided very few details about the plan. Management is apparently trying to manage the concerns of employees and the public by withholding information.

What we do know is that 100,000 carrier routes will be relocated from 6,000 or 7,000 post offices — which the USPS calls "spoke facilities' — to several hundred S&DC hubs. The Postal Service has shared a list of the first 200 post offices where “conversions” will take place, but it has said almost nothing about which others will become spoke offices.

With the help of publicly available USPS facility lists, Google maps, and some data crunching, it’s possible to build a model that helps answer this question. READ MORE.

Introducing the New USPS Sorting & Delivery Centers

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Congress and the Biden administration have been very good to the Postal Service: $10 billion in emergency pandemic relief, nearly $50 billion to fix the problems caused by the retiree healthcare benefit mandate, and $3 billion for electric vehicles. You’d think everything would be good for a while and we could stop hearing about the existential crisis facing the Postal Service.

Instead, the Postmaster General continues to call for drastic measures. His Delivering for America plan has already slowed down First Class mail and raised prices across the board, and it will eventually include reducing retail hours, closing post offices, and disposing of historic properties. The PMG is also talking about eliminating 50,000 jobs.

But before he gets around to cutting jobs and degrading the retail network, the Postmaster General wants to completely transform the delivery network. Next month he will begin moving letter carriers from the back of post offices to large facilities called Sorting & Delivery Centers. This promises to be the most massive change in postal operations in decades.

Rather than cutting expenses, this element of the DFA plan will actually run up delivery costs – to the tune of $2 billion a year, $16 billion over the remaining eight years of the 10-year plan. Much of the financial relief Biden and Congress have provided will be for naught, and the changes in the delivery network will ensure that more cost cutting is necessary. The plan is a bad deal for postal workers and for the country as a whole, and the Postal Service has not been straight with stakeholders, employees, and the public about what the consequences will be.

The plan, it’s important to note, has not been reviewed by the Postal Regulatory Commission, apparently because the Postal Service believes it involves operational matters outside the scope of the PRC’s Advisory Opinion process. Nor has the Office of Inspector General reviewed the plan, perhaps because there’s nothing to audit yet. If the Postal Service has asked a consulting company to review the plan, it has not made the study public.  READ MORE

Correction: This is more likely the site of the Indianapolis mega-plant. It's in a logistics park, too, but closer to where it appears on a map in a USPS presentation about the S&DC plan.
https://ambrosepg.com/uploads/pdf-downloads/Ambrose_ICLP_BuildingIBrochure_03.2022.pdf

The Arcade post office in downtown Nashville is being relocated after 100 years in the same spot. A petition drive saved the post office in 2009, but the new owner of the property doesn't want to renew the lease. https://www.newschannel5.com/news/arcade-post-office-in-downtown-nashville-potentially-moving-locations

The locations of the new USPS regional mega plants. Atlanta & Charlotte confirmed by media reports; Indianapolis, probable. For more details & links, visit the Google map. https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1dXsd-gyizCyOwQVpiqgKeTcwTbexr2k&usp=sharing

Not sure but this may be the site of the USPS mega-plant in Indianapolis. Like those in Charlotte and Atlanta, it's in a logistics park with an Amazon facility nearby. Btw, why hasn't USPS issued press releases with the exact locations of the new plants?
https://mount-comfort.cbre-properties.com/

The USPS mega-plant (1M SF) in Atlanta will be located in Palmetto Logistics Park in Fairborn. Like the new mega-plant in Charlotte, it's very close to an Amazon facility. Don't know if it will include a Sort & Delivery Center.
https://www.lee-associates.com/atlanta/wp-content/uploads/sites/77/2022/07/Q2_2022_Atlanta-Industrial-Market-Report_FINAL.pdf
https://colliersatlanta.com/eflyer/PalmettoLogisticsPark/index.html

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The Summer 2022 newsletter from Community and Postal Workers United (CPUW) has articles about the “Dump DeJoy” campaign, the crisis of understaffing, and providing non-postal government services at local post…
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The USPS and PRC should create a dashboard with information about post offices that have been suspended. It’s “a commonsense way to make sure the Postal Service is keeping everyone…
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Counting Up Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps

In August 2020, amidst the pre-election furor over collection box removals, a FOIA request was submitted to the USPS asking for data about the removals. Nineteen months later, the USPS…
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When the Postal Service considers closing a post office, it must go through a lengthy discontinuance process, with 30 steps of administrative review and opportunities for public input. But when…
Featured image for “How slower mail has become a fact of life: USPS Service Performance and Postal Reform”

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Emergency Suspension Dashboard

When the Postal Service closes a post office for an emergency, like unsafe building conditions after a weather event or a last-minute breakdown in lease negotiations, it's supposed to correct the problem as soon as possible — by making repairs, settling the lease issue or finding a new location. The Postal Service, however, may choose instead to initiate a study about whether or not to close the post office permanently.

The law does not specify a time frame for re-opening the office or completing the discontinuance process, so some post offices can end up in limbo for many years. A large backlog of unresolved suspensions sometimes develops. At the end of fiscal year 2021, there were about 450 post offices under suspension, nearly a hundred of them going back to 2012 or before.

In February, the Postal Regulatory Commission opened a Public Inquiry docket (its second on suspensions) to examine how the the resolution of these suspensions might be expedited, presumably through a modification of the rules governing discontinuances.

To provide a clearer picture of the suspensions and to lend some transparency to the process of resolving them as it unfolds, we’ve created a Suspension Dashboard. It includes a page for each of the 450 suspended offices, with information about its suspension status, community demographics and facility data.

You can view the new suspension dashboard here.

When the Postal Service closes a post office for an emergency, like unsafe building conditions after a weather event or a last-minute breakdown in lease negotiations, it's supposed to correct the problem as soon as possible — by making repairs, settling the lease issue or finding a new location. The Postal Service, however, may choose instead to initiate a study about whether or not to permanently close the post office.

The law does not specify a time frame for re-opening the office or completing the discontinuance process, so some post offices can end up in limbo for many years. A large backlog of unresolved suspensions sometimes develops. At the end of fiscal year 2021, there were about 450 post offices under suspension, nearly a hundred of them going back to 2012 or before.

In February, the Postal Regulatory Commission opened a Public Inquiry docket (its second on suspensions) to examine how the the resolution of these suspensions might be expedited, presumably through a modification of the rules governing discontinuances.

To provide a clearer picture of the suspensions and to lend some transparency to the process of resolving them as it unfolds, we’ve created a Suspension Dashboard. It includes a page for each of the 450 suspended offices, with information about its suspension status, community demographics and facility data.

You can view the new suspension dashboard here.

Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps

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On August 20, 2020, amidst the furor over box removals, Robert Bracco, using the muckrock.com FOIA request website, filed a request asking the Postal Service to provide data “pertaining to the existence, addition, removal, or relocation of USPS collection boxes inside the United States and territories created or altered after 8/15/2019.”

On March 25, 2022 — nineteen months after the request was filed, and after seventeen follow-up messages inquiring on the status of the request — the Postal Service finally responded. It provided three lists of collection box locations in service in December 2019, 2020 and 2021. The lists make it possible to track additions and removals over this two-year period. We have the lists and maps here.

Service Performance Update

Chart by Visualizer

On October 1, 2021, the Postal Service lowered service standards for First Class mail, saying that this would allow it to deliver 95 percent of the mail on time. Since October, scores have averaged about 89 percent, and the Postal Service now says it will not reach 95 percent for two or three years. The new target for FY 2022 is 91 percent.

The weekly performance scores are being submitted as evidence in Pennsylvania v. DeJoy. The most recent report is here. For more performance data, check out our dashboard.

Service Performance Update

Chart by Visualizer

On October 1, 2021, the Postal Service lowered service standards for First Class mail, saying that this would allow it to deliver 95 percent of the mail on time. Since October, scores have averaged about 89 percent, and the Postal Service now says it will not reach 95 percent for two or three years. The new target for FY 2022 is 91 percent.

The weekly performance scores are being submitted as evidence in Pennsylvania v. DeJoy. The most recent report is here. For more performance data, check out our dashboard.

The Year in Review

The Year in Review