To drop mail at the 20 post offices nearest the Newburgh P&DC, a contract truck drives about 100 miles (66 miles straight line). If the 180 carriers at these offices all go back & forth between the P&DC and their routes (an average of 17 miles RT), they’ll drive over 3,000 miles.

DeJoy's plan to move carrier routes from post offices to centralized facilities and thereby cut costs on the contract trucks that deliver the mail to these post offices may sound reasonable, but consider this....
https://www.govexec.com/workforce/2022/08/postal-employees-voice-major-concerns-usps-begins-implementing-its-delivery-consolidation-plan/375416/ via @GovExec

In fact, a 2012 OIG report estimated that an average of 1 extra mile between delivery unit and first stop on the carrier route would increase travel costs by $374 million on 9,800 DUOs. The savings came from reduced floor space per carrier and clerk labor.
https://www.uspsoig.gov/sites/default/files/document-library-files/2015/rarc-wp-12-015_0.pdf

Any savings from consolidating delivery units will not come from cutting travel costs. They'll come from eliminating clerk and postmaster jobs at the post offices that lose their carriers, reducing their retail hours, relocating to smaller spaces, etc.

The additional cost of having thousands of carriers traveling from the new sorting centers to their routes will far exceed the savings from eliminating contract trucks going from P&DC to delivery units. https://www.govexec.com/workforce/2022/08/postal-employees-voice-major-concerns-usps-begins-implementing-its-delivery-consolidation-plan/375416/ via @GovExec

In 2011-2015, the USPS relocated carrier operations at about 2750 post offices. Over half had their retail hours cut under POStPlan. If 7000 post offices see their delivery units closed, how many will also have their retail hours cut? (Cutting hours is part of the 10 Year Plan.)

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Featured image for “Community and Postal Workers United Summer 2022 Newsletter”

Community and Postal Workers United Summer 2022 Newsletter

The Summer 2022 newsletter from Community and Postal Workers United (CPUW) has articles about the “Dump DeJoy” campaign, the crisis of understaffing, and providing non-postal government services at local post…
Featured image for “To Be Discontinued: The Postal Service identifies 170 suspended post offices for permanent closure”

To Be Discontinued: The Postal Service identifies 170 suspended post offices for permanent closure

Earlier this week the Postal Service shared a list with the Postal Regulatory Commission identifying 170 post offices that were “temporarily” suspended several years ago and that will soon be…
Featured image for “Rationale for a Suspension Dashboard: Comments for the PRC’s Public Inquiry”

Rationale for a Suspension Dashboard: Comments for the PRC’s Public Inquiry

The USPS and PRC should create a dashboard with information about post offices that have been suspended. It’s “a commonsense way to make sure the Postal Service is keeping everyone…
Featured image for “Counting Up Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps”

Counting Up Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps

In August 2020, amidst the pre-election furor over collection box removals, a FOIA request was submitted to the USPS asking for data about the removals. Nineteen months later, the USPS…
Featured image for “Lost in Limbo: Post Offices Under Suspension”

Lost in Limbo: Post Offices Under Suspension

When the Postal Service considers closing a post office, it must go through a lengthy discontinuance process, with 30 steps of administrative review and opportunities for public input. But when…
Featured image for “How slower mail has become a fact of life: USPS Service Performance and Postal Reform”

How slower mail has become a fact of life: USPS Service Performance and Postal Reform

Last week the Postal Service published its service performance reports for the first quarter of fiscal year 2022 (Oct-Dec 2021). This is our first opportunity to see any details about…

Emergency Suspension Dashboard

When the Postal Service closes a post office for an emergency, like unsafe building conditions after a weather event or a last-minute breakdown in lease negotiations, it's supposed to correct the problem as soon as possible — by making repairs, settling the lease issue or finding a new location. The Postal Service, however, may choose instead to initiate a study about whether or not to close the post office permanently.

The law does not specify a time frame for re-opening the office or completing the discontinuance process, so some post offices can end up in limbo for many years. A large backlog of unresolved suspensions sometimes develops. At the end of fiscal year 2021, there were about 450 post offices under suspension, nearly a hundred of them going back to 2012 or before.

In February, the Postal Regulatory Commission opened a Public Inquiry docket (its second on suspensions) to examine how the the resolution of these suspensions might be expedited, presumably through a modification of the rules governing discontinuances.

To provide a clearer picture of the suspensions and to lend some transparency to the process of resolving them as it unfolds, we’ve created a Suspension Dashboard. It includes a page for each of the 450 suspended offices, with information about its suspension status, community demographics and facility data.

You can view the new suspension dashboard here.

When the Postal Service closes a post office for an emergency, like unsafe building conditions after a weather event or a last-minute breakdown in lease negotiations, it's supposed to correct the problem as soon as possible — by making repairs, settling the lease issue or finding a new location. The Postal Service, however, may choose instead to initiate a study about whether or not to permanently close the post office.

The law does not specify a time frame for re-opening the office or completing the discontinuance process, so some post offices can end up in limbo for many years. A large backlog of unresolved suspensions sometimes develops. At the end of fiscal year 2021, there were about 450 post offices under suspension, nearly a hundred of them going back to 2012 or before.

In February, the Postal Regulatory Commission opened a Public Inquiry docket (its second on suspensions) to examine how the the resolution of these suspensions might be expedited, presumably through a modification of the rules governing discontinuances.

To provide a clearer picture of the suspensions and to lend some transparency to the process of resolving them as it unfolds, we’ve created a Suspension Dashboard. It includes a page for each of the 450 suspended offices, with information about its suspension status, community demographics and facility data.

You can view the new suspension dashboard here.

Collection Box Removals in 2020-2021: Lists & Maps

Image

On August 20, 2020, amidst the furor over box removals, Robert Bracco, using the muckrock.com FOIA request website, filed a request asking the Postal Service to provide data “pertaining to the existence, addition, removal, or relocation of USPS collection boxes inside the United States and territories created or altered after 8/15/2019.”

On March 25, 2022 — nineteen months after the request was filed, and after seventeen follow-up messages inquiring on the status of the request — the Postal Service finally responded. It provided three lists of collection box locations in service in December 2019, 2020 and 2021. The lists make it possible to track additions and removals over this two-year period. We have the lists and maps here.

Service Performance Update

Chart by Visualizer

On October 1, 2021, the Postal Service lowered service standards for First Class mail, saying that this would allow it to deliver 95 percent of the mail on time. Since October, scores have averaged about 89 percent, and the Postal Service now says it will not reach 95 percent for two or three years. The new target for FY 2022 is 91 percent.

The weekly performance scores are being submitted as evidence in Pennsylvania v. DeJoy. The most recent report is here. For more performance data, check out our dashboard.

Service Performance Update

Chart by Visualizer

On October 1, 2021, the Postal Service lowered service standards for First Class mail, saying that this would allow it to deliver 95 percent of the mail on time. Since October, scores have averaged about 89 percent, and the Postal Service now says it will not reach 95 percent for two or three years. The new target for FY 2022 is 91 percent.

The weekly performance scores are being submitted as evidence in Pennsylvania v. DeJoy. The most recent report is here. For more performance data, check out our dashboard.

The Year in Review

The Year in Review